Thursday, February 16, 2017

Open Your Arms!


Willie I'm gonna miss ya:
“There has been no greater honor than to serve and protect the same community that opened its arms to my parents when they immigrated to this country,” Ferrer, 50, said in a statement released Wednesday, after informing the Southern District of Florida’s office of his resignation.
What about this nice lawyer, he took pictures to convey the stresses and reality of our local animal shelter while volunteering his time:
Luckily, Marcos Javier Garcia, 36, a Miami lawyer and emerging photographer, is the shelter volunteer kind of dog lover. He steeled his nerves and offered himself to the Miami-Dade Animal Services Pet Adoption and Protection Center (known as MDAS) in 2015. The shelter, like most public animal adoption centers across the country, was overcrowded and overwhelmed. (Around 7.6 million animals enter shelters each year, and nearly three million never make it out.)
  “Working as a volunteer — guiding people through the aisles looking for lost dogs, assisting people in viewing and adopting dogs, riding along with animal control cops and, what was worse, watching people surrender dogs to the shelter after signing a document advising them their dog may be euthanized — all of this gave me a firsthand perspective on what drove this problem: Supply outstripped demand,” Mr. Garcia said. “The economics of the shelter dog reality are as cold as its consequences. Given the finite amount of space to house the unwanted dogs, sometimes over 100 a day, harsh decisions must be made as to which dogs live and which dogs die.”
Might as well be the person your mom thinks you are.


Read
“Working as a volunteer — guiding people through the aisles looking for lost dogs, assisting people in viewing and adopting dogs, riding along with animal control cops and, what was worse, watching people surrender dogs to the shelter after signing a document advising them their dog may be euthanized — all of this gave me a firsthand perspective on what drove this problem: Supply outstripped demand,” Mr. Garcia said. “The economics of the shelter dog reality are as cold as its consequences. Given the finite amount of space to house the unwanted dogs, sometimes over 100 a day, harsh decisions must be made as to which dogs live and which dogs die.”more “Working as a volunteer — guiding people through the aisles looking for lost dogs, assisting people in viewing and adopting dogs, riding along with animal control cops and, what was worse, watching people surrender dogs to the shelter after signing a document advising them their dog may be euthanized — all of this gave me a firsthand perspective on what drove this problem: Supply outstripped demand,” Mr. Garcia said. “The economics of the shelter dog reality are as cold as its consequences. Given the finite amount of space to house the unwanted dogs, sometimes over 100 a day, harsh decisions must be made as to which dogs live and which dogs die.”“Working as a volunteer — guiding people through the aisles looking for lost dogs, assisting people in viewing and adopting dogs, riding along with animal control cops and, what was worse, watching people surrender dogs to the shelter after signing a document advising them their dog may be euthanized — all of this gave me a firsthand perspective on what drove this problem: Supply outstripped demand,” Mr. Garcia said. “The economics of the shelter dog reality are as cold as its consequences. Given the finite amount of space to house the unwanted dogs, sometimes over 100 a day, harsh decisions must be made as to which dogs live and which dogs die.”here: http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/article132905189.html#storylink=cpy


2 comments:

  1. Mr. Garcia is a Saint in my book.

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    Replies
    1. Same. Thanks for pointing that article out, SFL.

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