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Lewis Tein: The Rest of the (Alleged) Story.


I'm not sure why they waited so long to get their side of the story out on the table, but in both the state court proceedings and in federal court, Lewis Tein has moved for sanctions against the Miccosukee Tribe and their new counsel.

The state court 57.105 motion closely tracks the Rule 11 filing, and for those interested here is the Rule 11 reply filed yesterday.

This is the closing section:
The following four facts are relevant to considering the instant Rule 11 issue:
a. The Tribe maintains that its current chairman has no personal knowledge of the fraud allegations against Lewis Tein.
 

b. The Tribe's current vice-chairman testified that he knew of no facts supporting the Tribe's allegations of fraud against Lewis Tein.
 

c. In the Bermudez Case, the Tribe's attorney testified that he conducted no investigation to support the Tribe's accusations of fraud against Lewis Tein.
d. In the Florida RICO Case, the Tribe has refused to produce a single document or witness to support of its allegations of RICO and fraud against Lewis Tein.
The foregoing facts, combined with the absence of any evidence against Lewis Tein, establish that the Tribe's lawsuit was filed in bad faith and for improper purposes. Knowing there is no evidence, the Tribe and its lawyer continue to pursue this action.
They also have new counsel (artist's rendering below):


I'm sure everyone will be nice and respectful in comments.

Comments

  1. Ugh...I would not want to be in Paul Calli's cross hairs. The tribe better be ready to pony up with some evidence, or they and their counsel are going to have a miserable year and new year.

    ReplyDelete
  2. RE: They also have new counsel (artist's rendering below)"

    -you're so cheeky!

    ReplyDelete
  3. "Prominent law firm." I love how these small shops banter this term around about themselves. And "boutique." What a load of shit.

    ReplyDelete
  4. How can the tribe get away with this? This has rule 11 written all over it.

    ReplyDelete
  5. That pleading suggests the entire case against Lewis Tein is a bunch of bullshit. If the statements in that pleading are accurate, the Tribe is in deep trouble.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Does the Tribe's response say anything to support bringing the case?

    ReplyDelete
  7. Pacenti reported yesterday that Judge Cooke already dismissed the Rico against Lewis Tein based on insufficient facts

    ReplyDelete
  8. Here is the response filed by the Tribe:

    http://ia601503.us.archive.org/32/items/gov.uscourts.flsd.403110/gov.uscourts.flsd.403110.60.0.pdf

    ReplyDelete
  9. Anyone ever heard of the tribe's lawyer?

    ReplyDelete
  10. what a crock of shit. all the tribe writes in its response is to reiterate its conclusory accusations, argue that its too early because there has been no discovery, and make additonal accusations against LT.

    methinks judge cooke is not going to suffer the tribe ....

    ReplyDelete
  11. over/under on jail time?

    ReplyDelete
  12. Over under on tribe paying a few million more to Lewis Tein for their legal fees and for the tribe's lawyer being disbarred?

    ReplyDelete
  13. Tribe's current lawyer highly likely to go to prison for stealing from tribe.

    ReplyDelete
  14. That dude is super hot

    ReplyDelete

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