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Yes, Virginia, The Power of Law Can Be Used For Good.


In addition to Rumpy's eloquent comments today -- with which I agree totally -- I wanted to highlight a Florida lawyer who in my book qualifies as a true hero (even if he works in Pensacola):  David McGee.

This guy exposed CIA lies, denials, and evasions, and got to the truth on behalf of a client that the CIA hired under the table and then disavowed publicly when he was captured in Iran.  That client is either still in Iranian captivity or perhaps dead, but the truth of it all is now out thanks to David and his paralegal Sonya Dobbs.

(Sometimes this stuff happens in real life, not just on Homeland.)

Here's just a snippet of an amazing story that you should read in full:
The government's version would have remained the official story if not for Levinson's friends. One of them was David McGee, a former Justice Department prosecutor in Florida who had worked with Levinson when he was at the FBI. McGee, now in private practice at the Florida law firm Beggs and Lane, knew that Levinson was working for the CIA. He just couldn't prove it.

As time dragged on, McGee kept digging. Finally, he and his paralegal, Sonya Dobbs, discovered Levinson's emails with Jablonski.

They were astounded. And they finally had the proof they needed to get the government's attention.
Armed with the emails, McGee wrote to the Senate Intelligence Committee in October 2007. The CIA had indeed been involved in Levinson's trip, the letter proved.

The CIA had been caught telling Congress a story that was flatly untrue. The Intelligence Committee was furious. In particular, Levinson's senator, Bill Nelson, D-Fla., took a personal interest in the case. The committee controls the budget of the CIA, and one angry senator there can mean months of headaches for the agency.

CIA managers said their own employees had lied to them. They blamed the analysts for not coming forward sooner. But the evidence had been hiding in plain sight. The CIA didn't conduct a thorough investigation until the Senate got involved. By then, Levinson had been missing for more than eight months. Precious time had been lost.
To sum up, your life and job will have more meaning and be more satisfying if you do right by others and try to make a positive difference in the world.



Oh yeah, it's Friday:


Have a great weekend!

Comments

  1. We're only in it for the money! Happy Friday SFL.

    ReplyDelete
  2. First the pope and now SFL! Embrace the people's revolution comrades!

    ;-)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Happy Friday & Weekend, SFL.

    @12:17, Frank Zappa- love your kids names. :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. You blew it, SFL. Given the title of this post, you had a great opportunity to insert a link to Huey Lewis's The Power of Love. Alas, you didn't.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Spencer update: taking a depo on saturday and tweeting about it.

    ReplyDelete

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