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Do They Even Know About Hand-Pulled Noodles in Atlanta?



Dedicated readers know we have closely followed the local celebrity chef battle affectionately known as "Chow v. Chau."

Now this epic skirmish over.....what exactly?.... has journeyed through the court system all the way to the 11th Circuit!

But will the boys in Atlanta get the super-chic, hot Miami Beach restaurant scene and the subtle nuances involved in slowly pulling on one's noodle, when what passes for gourmet Chinese in Atlanta is General Tso's chicken and a cold Coca-cola?

Let's see:
Michael Chow is a chef who credits himself with introducing “high-end Chinese cuisine in a fine dining setting to the west” through the “Mr Chow” restaurants he opened across the country, first in Beverly Hills, California in 1974, then on 57th Street in New York City in 1979, next in the Tribeca neighborhood of New York City in 2006, and most recently in Miami Beach, Florida in 2009.  These restaurants serve a number of “signature dishes,” have distinctive décor and feature a performance of sorts, referred to as the “noodle show,” where a member of the staff makes fresh noodles by hand for the patrons.
The "noodle show" -- they do get it!

Comments

  1. Meet me at midnight!

    ReplyDelete
  2. A little too much noodle pulling going on for my taste. Bitches.

    ReplyDelete
  3. General Tso's chicken-- yum! I always order it minus the broccoli. I don't care for broccoli.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Thinking this is more interesting than reading about the law or noodle pulling. I am very liberal but this is one thing I do not understand:

    http://gawker.com/this-documentary-about-men-who-dress-up-like-rubber-dol-1496480109

    ReplyDelete
  5. @2:34

    Don't try to understand. We all have our own path. Just live and let live.

    Other people seem strange to me. I seem strange to other people. So long as we treat others with respect and kindness diversity is a strength.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I like the reporter's interview with a rubber doll replicant:

    http://gawker.com/man-dressed-as-living-doll-looks-just-like-his-interv-1500343619/@richjuz

    ReplyDelete
  7. 11:12 You are making a big mistake not ordering the broccoli. Broccoli is an excellent source of fiber and as a cruciferous vegetable has big anti-oxident and anti-cancer properties. As you get older you have an increased need for fiber to avoid potentially deadly conditions like diverticulosis.

    In sum, eat your broccoli.

    SA

    ReplyDelete
  8. When I perform my noodle show in a restaurant by putting my noodle in my hand, I always seem to get in trouble. What gives?

    ReplyDelete
  9. This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

    ReplyDelete

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