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Read the Donald Trump "Star Treatment" New Trial Motion!



Did Judge Streitfeld give Donald Trump the "star treatment" when he testified recently in Broward County circuit court?

Those are the blockbuster allegations in this new trial motion, which asserts that both the lending of the Judge's glasses and his jovial "You're Fired" tag at the end of The Donald's testimony unduly "elicited visible feelings of goodwill" toward that gaseous windbag the defendant.

Here's an excerpt on the "You're Fired" exchange:
It was utterly improper for the Court to initiate this exchange with the Defendant. “You’re fired!” is the tagline from Mr. Trump’s popular reality TV show, The Apprentice. It was not at issue in this case and referenced nowhere in the record. By invoking the tagline, the judge acknowledged Mr. Trump as a celebrity with a popular show on TV, and turned what was supposed to be a solemn courtroom proceeding into something more reminiscent of a reality show episode. The judge suggested to the jury that he was a fan of The Apprentice with the inference that the Court likes Mr. Trump and his show. The result was to support Mr. Trump as a “good guy” and likeable celebrity in front of the jury, and to elicit visible feelings of goodwill from the jury to the Defendant.  As such, any impartiality associated with the trial left after the glasses incident was utterly destroyed.
What do you think?

Any chance of success here or are the plaintiffs overstating the Judge's attempt at humor?

BTW our prior coverage of the incidents at issue is here.

Comments

  1. Because it was in front of the jury, it was improper. The Court essentially bolstered the credibility and character of the witness. Whether it was harmless error is another issue. The incident took place north of the Bunker's jurisdiction, so it is possible that it wasn't harmless...

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  2. Are the plaintiffs' overstating it? Yes. It's really impossible to tell whether two relatively small incidents could have influenced the outcome of the trial.

    That being said, should the judge have done those things? No. The "fired" bit was especially bad, and did give off the sense that the judge was seeking a favorable reaction from the witness. That was improper.

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  3. Did Beck object at the time?

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  4. Boneheaded on part of judge - but did the lawyers object or request a curative instruction?

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  5. there's a lot more in the motion. the judge apparently threatened to throw something at the plaintiff's lawyer in front of the jury at one point

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  6. also, what's with BSO keeping the plaintiff out of the courtroom during Trump's testimony?

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  7. Compare this performance to the way Judge Dresnick handled Tiger Woods' testimony last week.

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  8. This is a winner.

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  9. BSO escorted Trump in and let him park in the judge's private parking lot. Classic Broweird.

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  10. In Los Angeles, celebrities on trial go through the front door all the time. Why did Trump get to go through the back way in Broward?

    ReplyDelete

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