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Drug Warrior Mea Culpa


When overt racism became impolitic, sneaky segregationists developed more covert means. So says Federal Judge Nancy Gertner.
“This is a war that I saw destroy lives,” she said. “It eliminated a generation of African American men, covered our racism in ostensibly neutral guidelines and mandatory minimums… and created an intergenerational problem––although I wasn't on the bench long enough to see this, we know that the sons and daughters of the people we sentenced are in trouble, and are in trouble with the criminal justice system.”

She added that the War on Drugs eliminated the political participation of its casualties. “We were not leveling cities as we did in WWII with bombs, but with prosecution, prison, and punishment,” she said, explaining that her life’s work is now focused on trying to reconstruct the lives that she undermined––as a general matter, by advocating for reform, and as a specific project: she is trying to go through the list of all the people she sentenced to see who deserves executive clemency.
Post-racial society my tanned keister.

Comments

  1. Sentencing disparity is wrong and needs to be corrected. Locking people up for nonviolent drug offenses is bad policy. But come on, the drug laws were not some sort of covert racist plot. That is black helicopter stuff.

    ReplyDelete
  2. The racism inherent in the drug war is obvious to anyone with eyes.

    ReplyDelete
  3. "There are 100,000 total marijuana smokers in the U.S., and most are Negroes, Hispanics, Filipinos and entertainers. Their Satanic music, jazz and swing result from marijuana use. This marijuana causes white women to seek sexual relations with Negroes, entertainers and any others."
    “Reefer makes darkies think they're as good as white men."

    ReplyDelete
  4. Now you want to be me and Markus??

    ReplyDelete
  5. I is what I is! And what I is is looking for an easy post! ;-) #vacation

    ReplyDelete

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