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Sieg Heil Sweeties!


And here I thought Aaron Schock's Downton Abbey style office was tacky!
An Oregon judge who refused to perform same-sex marriages is facing multiple complaints in a state ethics investigation, including that he put up a picture of Adolf Hitler in the Salem courthouse, a state judicial commission said on Tuesday.
Marion County Circuit Court Judge Vance Day is facing an ethics review for screening wedding applicants for gay couples and then refusing to perform the marriages, according to a notice by the Commission on Judicial Fitness and Disability.
A U.S. Supreme Court decision in late June legalized same-sex marriage in all 50 states, but a small number of elected clerks and lower-court judges have voiced opposition on religious grounds, including Kentucky county clerk Kim Davis who was released from jail on Tuesday after refusing to issue same-sex marriage licenses.
In addition to the wedding refusal, Day faces complaints of putting up a picture of Hitler in the Marion County courthouse and allowing a veteran with a felony to handle a firearm.
Patrick Korten, a spokeswoman for Day, said the complaints were baseless. He said the Hitler picture was part of a display to honor the service of veterans in World War Two and not to glorify the Nazi dictator. "We went to war against Hitler," Korten said. "His picture was there. It was not admiringly. It was him as the epitome of the enemy that we went to fight against."
Day has retained an attorney and will be allowed to present evidence at a Nov. 9 hearing, according to the judicial commission notice.
Does this mean we should honor the veterans of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars with pictures of Osama bin Laden and Saddam Hussein? What is it with counties named Marion?

Comments

  1. I spent an entire day at Yad Vashem once and there were like maybe one or two pictures of Hitler in the whole place.

    ReplyDelete
  2. That's because Yad Vashem isn't there to honor Hitler. Displaying a picture is an sign of approval outside of a museum setting.

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  3. That's downright bizarre -- and coming from me that says a lot!

    ReplyDelete
  4. (I was trying to be snarky with my Yad Vashem comment)

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  5. I'd say context is everything. Maybe it was a celebration of the healthy life style of teetotaler vegetarians who love dogs?

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  6. @4:49 I got that!

    @SFL I'm going with a tribute to megalomaniac meth addicts. They never get the credit they deserve!

    ReplyDelete
  7. GW

    How 'bout a megalomaniac PI lawyer ?

    GB

    ReplyDelete

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