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Happy You Can't Go to Court Anymore Day!


As the mainstream media finally gets around to noticing that normal people rarely get to court anymore, the 11th Circuit also takes a look.

But first the NYT sets the stage:
[A]arbitration, an investigation by The New York Times has found, often bears little resemblance to court.

Over the last 10 years, thousands of businesses across the country — from big corporations to storefront shops — have used arbitration to create an alternate system of justice. There, rules tend to favor businesses, and judges and juries have been replaced by arbitrators who commonly consider the companies their clients, The Times found.

The change has been swift and virtually unnoticed, even though it has meant that tens of millions of Americans have lost a fundamental right: their day in court.

“This amounts to the whole-scale privatization of the justice system,” said Myriam Gilles, a law professor at the Benjamin N. Cardozo School of Law. “Americans are actively being deprived of their rights.”
All it took was adding simple arbitration clauses to contracts that most employees and consumers do not even read. Yet at stake are claims of medical malpractice, sexual harassment, hate crimes, discrimination, theft, fraud, elder abuse and wrongful death, records and interviews show.
Meanwhile, the 11th Circuit enforces an arbitration clause in an opinion curiously devoid of even a whiff of the important policy discussions animating this debate:
We hold that the Loan Agreement contains a delegation provision and, though Parnell challenged the validity of the arbitration provision, he did not articulate a challenge to the delegation provision specifically. Therefore, the FAA requires that we treat the delegation provision as valid, enforce the terms of the Loan Agreement, and leave to the arbitrator the determination of whether the Loan Agreement’s arbitration provision is enforceable.
Have fun with that, kids!

Comments

  1. WWSHD?

    (What Would Sean Hannity Do?)

    ReplyDelete
  2. And then second rate organizations like the AAA rake in unwarranted fees for sub par service.

    ReplyDelete
  3. Fake Joel Brown:

    Be seated.

    ReplyDelete
  4. The moral of this story: Republicans suck, and any non multimillionaire who votes Republican is an idiot.

    ReplyDelete

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