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Drink Up Bitches!


Clean water for me, but not for thee!
A newly obtained document and related emails released on Thursday show that while the residents of Flint, Michigan were slowly being poisoned by lead-contaminated water last year, the offices of state officials in the city were "quietly" outfitted with water coolers by Gov. Rick Snyder's administration.
"While residents were being told to relax and not worry about the water, the Snyder administration was taking steps to limit exposure in its own building." —Lonnie Scott, Progress Michigan
The emails—obtained by Progress Michigan and posted online here (pdf)—reveal an exchange between employees of the Michigan Department of Technology, Management and Budget (DTMB) and other state officials regarding in-house "concern about Flint's WQ [water quality]" that occurred at a time in 2015 when many residents still had no idea there was a problem with the city's public water and more than ten months before Gov. Rick Snyder ultimately declared a state of emergency over the crisis. The document at issue—dated January 7, 2015—is an administrative order showing the state had decided to provide bottled-water coolers "positioned near water fountains" in state offices so that workers could "choose which water to drink."
So you get to choose! Poison, or not poison. Which would you choose? When and where clean water is an option, I'll always go with that. But what about when it's not an option? I'm talking to YOU Florida!
After rejecting efforts to require the oil and gas industry to disclose carcinogens and monitor the effects of fracking on pregnant women and drinking water, the Florida House on Wednesday passed a bill to open the door to the high-pressure drilling technique. The measure, HB 191, allows the state to regulate and authorize the pumping of large volumes of water, sand and chemicals into the ground using high pressure to recover oil and gas deposits. It passed by a 73-45 vote with seven Republicans joining Democrats to oppose the measure. The bill bans the practice until state environmental regulators complete a study in 2017 to determine what potential impact the operations will have on the state’s geology and fragile water supply but also prohibits local governments from imposing their own bans or regulations.
Sorry miss, that was only a little bit of carcinogens in your children's water.

Comments

  1. Water?

    It's a mixer sweetie, we have it with whiskey.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Water, water, every where, and not a drop to drink...the water issue is America’s albatross, evidence the United States is going the way of the third world.

    Catarina de Albuquerque video, wow!
    Water for Life. Water and Sanitation as a Human Right
    https://youtu.be/a7j0ICTDASk

    Water and sanitation is a Human Right
    http://www.peepoople.com/

    Special Rapporteur on the human right to safe drinking water and sanitation
    http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/WaterAndSanitation/SRWater/Pages/SRWaterIndex.aspx

    Resolution 64/292 right to safe drinking water and sanitation.
    http://www.un.org/es/comun/docs/?symbol=A/RES/64/292&lang=E

    ReplyDelete
  3. Thanks for all the good links @3:07!

    ReplyDelete

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